Bills upcoming for a vote in the legislature.

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Diesel Emissions Reduction Act of 2019

S 747Environmental Protection • Introduced by Thomas Carper on 2019-3-12

Status: Awaiting floor or committee vote

Last action: 2019-5-13

USE IT Act

S 383Environmental Protection • Introduced by John Barrasso on 2019-2-7

Status: Awaiting floor or committee vote

Last action: 2019-5-13

Improving Science in Chemical Assessments Act

HR 6468Environmental Protection • Introduced by Andy Biggs on 2018-7-23

Status: Awaiting floor or committee vote

Last action: 2018-12-28

A bill to amend the Morris K. Udall and Stewart L. Udall Foundation Act.

S 2827Environmental Protection • Introduced by Martin Heinrich on 2018-5-10

Status: Passed One Chamber

Last action: 2018-12-17

Ensuring Meaningful Petition Outreach While Enhancing Rights of States Act of 2018

HR 6345Environmental Protection • Introduced by Stevan Pearce on 2018-7-12

Has summary

Status: Awaiting floor or committee vote

Last action: 2018-11-27

Endangered Species Transparency and Reasonableness Act

HR 3608Environmental Protection • Introduced by Tom McClintock on 2017-7-28

Status: Awaiting floor or committee vote

Last action: 2018-11-27

FISH Act

HR 3916Environmental Protection • Introduced by Ken Calvert on 2017-10-3

Status: Awaiting floor or committee vote

Last action: 2018-7-18

Innovative Stormwater Infrastructure Act of 2018

HR 3906Environmental Protection • Introduced by Denny Heck on 2017-10-2

Has summary

Status: Passed One Chamber

Last action: 2018-7-17

Vote

Innovative Stormwater Infrastructure Act of 2017

This bill requires the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to provide grants to eligible higher education institutions and research institutions to establish and maintain between three and five centers of excellence for innovative stormwater control infrastructure, which is any green stormwater management technique that: (1) uses natural systems or engineered systems that mimic natural processes to infiltrate, evapotranspire, or capture stormwater; and (2) preserves, enhances, or mimics natural hydrology to protect or restore water quality. One of the centers must be the national electronic clearinghouse center and operate a website and a public database on the infrastructure.

In addition, the EPA must provide grants to state, tribal, or local governments or entities that manage stormwater, drinking water resources, or wastewater resources for innovative stormwater control infrastructure projects.

The EPA must ensure that: (1) EPA's Office of Water, Office of Enforcement and Compliance, Office of Research and Development, and Office of Policy promote the use of the infrastructure in, and coordinate the integration of, permitting programs, planning efforts, research, technical assistance, and funding guidance; and (2) the Office of Water supports establishing innovative financing mechanisms in the implementation of the infrastructure. The EPA must: (1) direct each EPA regional office to promote and integrate the use of the infrastructure within the region, and (2) promote sharing information about the infrastructure approaches.

The EPA must establish the innovative stormwater control infrastructure portfolio standard of voluntary, measurable goals to increase the percentage of annual water managed by entities that use the infrastructure.

Listing Reform Act

HR 717Environmental Protection • Introduced by Pete Olson on 2017-1-27

Has summary

Status: Awaiting floor or committee vote

Last action: 2018-2-15

Vote

(This measure has not been amended since it was introduced. The summary has been expanded because action occurred on the measure.)

Listing Reform Act

(Sec. 2) This bill amends the Endangered Species Act of 1973 to allow the Department of the Interior or the Department of Commerce, as appropriate, to prioritize the consideration of petitions to list a species as endangered or threatened other than in the order in which the petitions are received. The appropriate department may not give general priority to petitions to add species to the list of endangered or threatened species over petitions to remove a species from the list.

The deadline for the appropriate department to decide on whether or not a petition to list or remove a species should be granted is changed from within 12 months to as expeditiously as possible.

The appropriate department is given the authority to preclude the listing of a species as threatened due to the likelihood of significant, cumulative economic effects that would result from such listing or from the likely resulting designation of critical habitat of the species. Once a petition is precluded due to those economic effects, the appropriate department may not reconsider that finding unless the department: (1) determines there is endangerment of extinction of the species; or (2) receives a new petition to add the species to the list that includes an analyses concluding that alternative actions are possible other than those resulting in significant, cumulative economic effects.

Brownfields Enhancement, Economic Redevelopment, and Reauthorization Act of 2017

HR 3017Environmental Protection • Introduced by David McKinley on 2017-6-22

Has summary

Status: Passed One Chamber

Last action: 2017-12-1

Vote

Brownfields Enhancement, Economic Redevelopment, and Reauthorization Act of 2017

(Sec. 2) This bill modifies the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) to specify if a state or local government takes title to a brownfield site as a result of law enforcement activity, that government is not an owner or operator for the purposes of CERCLA. (Brownfields are certain commercial properties that are hindered from reuse or redevelopment due to the presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant.)

(Sec. 3) The bill modifies brownfield program eligibility with respect to petroleum sites where no viable responsible party exists. Specifically, it eliminates the requirement that sites be of relatively low risk.

(Sec. 4) The bill revises leaseholder status regarding bona fide prospective purchasers.

(Sec. 5) The bill expands CERCLA eligibility for nonprofit organizations and qualified community development entities.

(Sec. 6) The brownfield site characterization and assessment grant program and the brownfield remediation grant and loan program are revised by authorizing eligible governmental entities to receive grants and loans for property that was acquired before January 11, 2002, even if the entities do not qualify as bona fide prospective purchasers.

(Sec. 7) The bill increases the cap on the amount that may be given in grants and loans for each site to be remediated.

(Sec. 8) The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must establish a program to provide multipurpose grants to carry out inventory, characterization, assessment, planning, or remediation activities at brownfield sites.

(Sec. 9) The bill allows grant recipients to use up to 5% of funds for administrative costs.

(Sec. 10) The EPA must consider the production of renewable energy on brownfield sites as part of the grant application ranking process.

(Sec. 11) The EPA is allowed to provide grants to assist small communities, Indian tribes, rural areas, or disadvantaged areas for the purpose of establishing a brownfields program.

(Sec. 12) The bill reauthorizes brownfields revitalization funding through FY2022.

(Sec. 13) The bill reauthorizes state response programs through FY2022.

Brownfields Reauthorization Act of 2017

HR 1758Environmental Protection • Introduced by Elizabeth Esty on 2017-3-28

Has summary

Status: Awaiting floor or committee vote

Last action: 2017-11-21

Vote

Brownfields Reauthorization Act of 2017

(Sec. 2) This bill modifies the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) to specify if a state or local government takes title to a brownfield site as a result of law enforcement activity, that government is not an owner or operator for the purposes of CERCLA. (Brownfields are certain commercial properties that are hindered from reuse or redevelopment due to the presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant.)

(Sec. 3) The bill modifies brownfield program eligibility with respect to petroleum sites where no viable responsible party exists. Specifically, it eliminates the requirement that sites be of relatively low risk.

(Sec. 4) The bill revises leaseholder status regarding bona fide prospective purchasers.

(Sec. 5) The bill expands CERCLA eligibility for nonprofit organizations and qualified community development entities.

(Sec. 6) The brownfield site characterization and assessment grant program and the brownfield remediation grant and loan program are revised by authorizing eligible governmental entities to receive grants and loans for property that was acquired before January 11, 2002, even if the entities do not qualify as bona fide prospective purchasers.

(Sec. 7) The bill increases the cap on the amount that may be given in grants and loans for each site to be remediated.

(Sec. 8) The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must establish a program to provide multipurpose grants to carry out inventory, characterization, assessment, planning, or remediation activities at brownfield sites.

(Sec. 9) The bill allows grant recipients to use up to 5% of funds for administrative costs.

(Sec. 10) The bill reauthorizes brownfields revitalization funding through FY2022.

(Sec. 11) The bill reauthorizes state response programs through FY2022.

Drinking Water System Improvement Act of 2017

HR 3387Environmental Protection • Introduced by Gregg Harper on 2017-7-25

Has summary

Status: Awaiting floor or committee vote

Last action: 2017-11-1

Vote

Drinking Water System Improvement Act of 2017

This bill amends the Safe Drinking Water Act to provide support for public water systems and promote compliance by the systems with drinking water regulations.

The bill expands requirements concerning consumer confidence reports issued by community water systems.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or a state with primary enforcement authority responsibility under the Act may require the owners or operators of certain public water systems that have repeatedly violated national primary drinking water regulations to consolidate or transfer ownership.

The EPA must develop a strategic plan for improving the accuracy and availability of compliance monitoring data.

The bill expands risk assessment requirements for community water systems to include risks from natural hazards. The bill creates a grant program within the EPA called the Drinking Water Infrastructure Risk and Resilience Program.

The bill: (1) reauthorizes through FY2022 the public water system supervision grant program and the source water petition program, and (2) reauthorizes through FY2022 and revises the drinking water state revolving fund.

The bill expands requirements for public water systems to monitor unregulated containments.

The EPA must establish a grant program for the replacement of drinking water fountains that contain lead in schools and day care facilities.

This bill amends the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act of 1986 to ensure that states and community water systems are notified of a release of a contaminant into their source waters.

Water Infrastructure Flexibility Act

S 692Environmental Protection • Introduced by Deb Fischer on 2017-3-21

Has summary

Status: Passed One Chamber

Last action: 2017-10-13

Vote

Water Infrastructure Flexibility Act

(This measure has not been amended since it was reported to the Senate on May 25, 2017. The summary of that version is repeated here.)

(Sec. 3) This bill amends the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (commonly known as the Clean Water Act) to allow municipalities to develop a plan that integrates wastewater and stormwater management.

A permit for a municipal discharge under the national pollutant discharge elimination system that incorporates an integrated plan may integrate all requirements under the Act addressed in the plan, including requirements relating to: (1) a combined sewer overflow; (2) a capacity, management, operation, and maintenance program for sanitary sewer collection systems; (3) a municipal stormwater discharge; (4) a municipal wastewater discharge; and (5) a total maximum daily load program.

Those permits may include a schedule of compliance that allows actions for meeting water quality-based effluent limitations to be implemented over more than one permit term if the compliance schedules are authorized by state water quality standards. Those actions may include implementing green infrastructure as part of a water quality-based effluent limitation. (Green infrastructure includes measures that mimic natural processes to store, reuse, or reduce stormwater.)

The bill establishes an Office of the Municipal Ombudsman in the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to provide: (1) technical assistance to municipalities seeking to comply with the Clean Water Act and the Safe Drinking Water Act, and (2) information to the EPA to ensure that agency policies are implemented by all EPA offices.

(Sec. 4) The EPA must ensure that specified EPA offices promote the integration of green infrastructure into permitting programs, planning efforts, research, technical assistance, and funding guidance.

(Sec. 5) The bill establishes requirements for revising the EPA's 1997 guidance about combined sewer overflows, including by setting forth criteria for determining the ability of households to pay utility bills. (Combined sewer systems collect rainwater, sewage, and industrial wastewater into one pipe. During storms, the combined wastewater sometimes exceeds the capacity of the treatment plant. When this occurs, combined sewer overflows discharge directly into water bodies.)

Community Reclamation Partnerships Act

HR 2937Environmental Protection • Introduced by Darin LaHood on 2017-6-20

Has summary

Status: Passed One Chamber

Last action: 2017-10-3

Vote

Community Reclamation Partnerships Act

This bill amends the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) to revise the abandoned mine land reclamation program which restores land and water adversely impacted by surface coal mines that were abandoned before SMCRA's enactment.

A state with an approved abandoned mine reclamation program may enter into a memorandum of understanding with relevant federal or state agencies (or both) for remediating mine drainage on abandoned mine land and water impacted by abandoned mines.

In addition, the bill authorizes a partnership between a state and a community reclaimer for remediating abandoned mine land if:

  • the partnership's proposed project is consistent with an approved state memorandum of understanding and conducted on certain prioritized sites;
  • the state assumes all responsibly on behalf of the community reclaimer and the owner of the proposed project site for costs or damages resulting from actions or inactions of the community reclaimer in carrying out the project, except for gross negligence or intentional misconduct by the community reclaimer; and
  • the state has necessary legal authority to conduct the project and has financial resources to ensure the project's completion.

A community reclaimer is a person who: (1) voluntarily assists a state in a reclamation project, (2) did not participate in any way in the creation of site conditions at the proposed site or activities that caused any land or waters to become eligible for reclamation or drainage abatement expenditures under SMCRA, (3) is not a past or current owner or operator of any site with ongoing reclamation obligations, and (4) is not subject to outstanding violations of surface coal mining permits.

Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Amendments Act of 2017

S 1057Environmental Protection • Introduced by Bill Nelson on 2017-5-4

Has summary

Status: Passed One Chamber

Last action: 2017-9-27

Vote

Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Amendments Act of 2017

This bill amends the Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research and Control Act of 1998 to reauthorize for FY2019-FY2023 the national harmful algal bloom and hypoxia program and the action strategy of the Inter-Agency Task Force on Harmful Algal Blooms and Hypoxia. (Hypoxia is a deficiency of oxygen.)

(Sec. 3) The task force must include a representative from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

(Sec. 4) Each required scientific assessment of harmful algal blooms in coastal waters must examine freshwater harmful algal blooms that originate in freshwater lakes or rivers and migrate to coastal waters.

(Sec. 5) In administering the program, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) must provide: (1) grants for accelerating the utilization of effective methods of intervention and mitigation to reduce the frequency, severity, and impacts of harmful algal bloom and hypoxia events; and (2) technical assistance to regional state, tribal, and local governments with respect to harmful algal blooms and hypoxia events.

NOAA must use cost effective methods in carrying out the Act and develop contingency plans for the long-term monitoring of hypoxia.

(Sec. 7) Federal officials may determine whether a harmful algal bloom or hypoxia event is an event of national significance and give funding to the affected state or local government for assessing and mitigating the detrimental environmental, economic, subsistence use, and public health effects of an event of national significance.

WILD Act

S 826Environmental Protection • Introduced by John Barrasso on 2017-4-4

Has summary

Status: Passed One Chamber

Last action: 2017-9-7

Vote

Wildlife Innovation and Longevity Driver Act or the WILD Act

This bill reauthorizes through FY2022 several programs that provide funding for wildlife conservation and sets forth requirements for invasive species management.

TITLE I--PARTNERS FOR FISH AND WILDLIFE PROGRAM REAUTHORIZATION

(Sec. 1001) This bill reauthorizes through FY2022 the Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program.

TITLE II--FISH AND WILDLIFE COORDINATION

(Sec. 2002) This bill amends the Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act to direct federal agencies that have duties relating to invasive species management for the protection of water and wildlife to: (1) inhibit or reduce the populations of invasive species and effectuate restoration or reclamation efforts on land the agencies manage, and (2) develop a strategic plan for implementing an invasive species program designed to achieve a substantive annual net reduction of invasive species populations or infested acreage in managed areas. Under a strategic plan, agencies must prioritize the use of methods that control and manage invasive species in the least costly manner, are based on sound science, and minimize environmental impacts. Further, agencies must expedite projects and activities that are in areas at high risk for invasive species and require immediate action to address the risk.

The bill sets forth: (1) requirements for how agencies may use funds made available for invasive species management, and (2) reporting requirements.

TITLE III--WILDLIFE CONSERVATION

(Sec. 3001) This bill reauthorizes through FY2022 the African Elephant Conservation Act, the Asian Elephant Conservation Act of 1997, the Rhinoceros and Tiger Conservation Act of 1994, the Great Ape Conservation Fund, and the Marine Turtle Conservation Fund.

This bill amends the Great Ape Conservation Act of 2000, including to authorize the Department of the Interior to award a multi-year grant for carrying out a project that is an effective, long-term conservation strategy for great apes (defined in the Act as chimpanzees, gorillas, bonobos, orangutans, and gibbons) and their habitats.

This bill amends the Marine Turtle Conservation Act of 2004 to make a wildlife management authority of a U.S. territory eligible for financial assistance for marine turtle conservation.

TITLE IV--PRIZE COMPETITIONS

(Sec. 4002) The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service must establish Theodore Roosevelt Genius Prizes for: (1) prevention of wildlife poaching and trafficking, (2) promotion of wildlife conservation, (3) management of invasive species, (4) protection of endangered species, and (5) nonlethal management of human-wildlife conflicts. The bill establishes advisory boards for those prizes.

BUILD Act

S 822Environmental Protection • Introduced by James Inhofe on 2017-4-4

Has summary

Status: Awaiting floor or committee vote

Last action: 2017-9-7

Vote

Brownfields Utilization, Investment, and Local Development Act of 2017 or the BUILD Act

This bill amends the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 to revise programs and funding regarding brownfields. (Brownfields are certain commercial properties that are hindered from reuse or redevelopment due to the presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant. Owners or operators of such sites may be financially liable for cleanup costs.)

(Sec. 2) The bill makes certain nonprofit organizations and community development entities eligible for brownfields revitalization funding.

(Sec. 3) The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must provide multipurpose grants to carry out inventory, characterization, assessment, planning, or remediation activities at brownfield sites.

(Sec. 4) The brownfield site characterization and assessment grant program is revised to authorize eligible governmental entities to receive grants for property that was acquired before January 11, 2002, even if the entities do not qualify as bona fide prospective purchasers.

(Sec. 5) The bill increases the cap on the amount that may be given in grants and loans for each site to be remediated.

(Sec. 7) The EPA must (currently, may) award grants for training, research, and technical assistance to facilitate the inventory of brownfield sites, site assessments, remediation of brownfield sites, community involvement, or site preparation. The EPA may use up to a specified amount of the funding to assist small communities, Indian tribes, rural areas, or disadvantaged areas.

(Sec. 8) The EPA must give consideration to waterfront brownfield sites located adjacent to bodies of water or federally designated floodplains when providing brownfield grants.

(Sec. 9) The EPA must award grants to: (1) carry out inventory, characterization, assessment, planning, feasibility analysis, design, or remediation activities to locate a clean energy project at brownfield sites; and (2) capitalize a revolving loan fund for those purposes. A clean energy project means: (1) a facility that generates renewable electricity from wind, solar, or geothermal energy; and (2) any energy efficiency improvement project at a facility.

(Sec. 11) The bill excludes state and local governments as owners or operators regarding property acquired through law enforcement activity, escheatment, and eminent domain.

Alaska Native villages and corporations are excluded as owners or operators if they received contaminated property from the federal government. This exclusion does not apply to an entity that causes or contributes to a hazardous substance release.

The bill allows tenants and lessees of a property to qualify as bona fide prospective purchasers.

(Sec. 12) The bill: (1) reauthorizes through FY2020 and revises brownfields revitalization funding, and (2) reauthorizes through FY2020 state and tribal response programs (programs responding to brownfields).

BUILD Act

S 822Environmental Protection • Introduced by James Inhofe on 2017-4-4

Has summary

Status: Awaiting floor or committee vote

Last action: 2017-9-7

Vote

Brownfields Utilization, Investment, and Local Development Act of 2017 or the BUILD Act

This bill amends the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 to revise programs and funding regarding brownfields. (Brownfields are certain commercial properties that are hindered from reuse or redevelopment due to the presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant. Owners or operators of such sites may be financially liable for cleanup costs.)

(Sec. 2) The bill makes certain nonprofit organizations and community development entities eligible for brownfields revitalization funding.

(Sec. 3) The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) must provide multipurpose grants to carry out inventory, characterization, assessment, planning, or remediation activities at brownfield sites.

(Sec. 4) The brownfield site characterization and assessment grant program is revised to authorize eligible governmental entities to receive grants for property that was acquired before January 11, 2002, even if the entities do not qualify as bona fide prospective purchasers.

(Sec. 5) The bill increases the cap on the amount that may be given in grants and loans for each site to be remediated.

(Sec. 7) The EPA must (currently, may) award grants for training, research, and technical assistance to facilitate the inventory of brownfield sites, site assessments, remediation of brownfield sites, community involvement, or site preparation. The EPA may use up to a specified amount of the funding to assist small communities, Indian tribes, rural areas, or disadvantaged areas.

(Sec. 8) The EPA must give consideration to waterfront brownfield sites located adjacent to bodies of water or federally designated floodplains when providing brownfield grants.

(Sec. 9) The EPA must award grants to: (1) carry out inventory, characterization, assessment, planning, feasibility analysis, design, or remediation activities to locate a clean energy project at brownfield sites; and (2) capitalize a revolving loan fund for those purposes. A clean energy project means: (1) a facility that generates renewable electricity from wind, solar, or geothermal energy; and (2) any energy efficiency improvement project at a facility.

(Sec. 11) The bill excludes state and local governments as owners or operators regarding property acquired through law enforcement activity, escheatment, and eminent domain.

Alaska Native villages and corporations are excluded as owners or operators if they received contaminated property from the federal government. This exclusion does not apply to an entity that causes or contributes to a hazardous substance release.

The bill allows tenants and lessees of a property to qualify as bona fide prospective purchasers.

(Sec. 12) The bill: (1) reauthorizes through FY2020 and revises brownfields revitalization funding, and (2) reauthorizes through FY2020 state and tribal response programs (programs responding to brownfields).

Ozone Standards Implementation Act of 2017

HR 806Environmental Protection • Introduced by Pete Olson on 2017-2-1

Has summary

Status: Passed One Chamber

Last action: 2017-7-19

Vote

(This measure has not been amended since it was reported to the House on July 14, 2017. The summary of that version is repeated here.)

Ozone Standards Implementation Act of 2017

This bill amends the Clean Air Act to revise the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) program.

(Sec. 2) The bill delays the implementation of the ozone NAAQS that were published in 2015. The bill extends until: (1) October 26, 2024, the deadline for states to submit designations to implement the 2015 ozone NAAQS; and (2) October 26, 2025, the deadline for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to designate state areas as attainment, nonattainment, or unclassifiable areas with respect to the 2015 ozone NAAQS. States must submit a state implementation plan (SIP) by October 26, 2026, to implement, maintain, and enforce the 2015 ozone NAAQS.

The bill exempts from the 2015 ozone standards certain preconstruction permit applications that were completed or submitted before a final designation was made.

(Sec. 3) The bill also changes the review cycle for criteria pollutant NAAQS from a 5-year review cycle to a 10-year review cycle. The EPA may not complete its next review of ozone NAAQS before October 26, 2025.

The EPA may consider, as a secondary consideration, likely technological feasibility in establishing and revising NAAQS for a pollutant if a range of air quality levels for such pollutant are requisite to protect public health with an adequate margin of safety.

Prior to establishing or revising NAAQS, the EPA must obtain advice from its scientific advisory committee regarding potential adverse public health, welfare, social, economic, or energy effects which may result from attaining and maintaining NAAQS.

The EPA must publish regulations and guidance for implementing NAAQS concurrently with the issuance of a new or revised standard. New or revised NAAQS shall not apply to preconstruction permits for constructing or modifying a stationary source of air pollutants until those regulations and guidance have been published.

The bill provides that in Extreme Ozone Nonattainment Areas, contingency measures are not required to be included in nonattainment plans. Technological achievability and economic feasibility must be taken into consideration in plan revisions for milestones for particulate matter nonattainment areas.

The bill redefines "exceptional events," by including stagnation of air masses that are not ordinarily occurring.

The EPA must: (1) report on foreign emissions and their impact on compliance with the NAAQS program in the United States, (2) study and report on the atmospheric formation of ozone and effective control strategies, and (3) incorporate the results of the study into rules and guidance implementing the 2015 ozone standards.

(Sec. 4) The bill exempts states from sanctions or fees for nonattainment or deficiency relating to certain ozone and particulate matter if the state can demonstrate specified circumstances preventing attainment. This exemption shall not affect any obligation of states or localities under the Clean Air Act to attain a NAAQS for ozone or particulate matter.

(Sec. 6) The bill specifies that no additional funds are authorized for carrying out the requirements of this bill.

Long Island Sound Restoration and Stewardship Act

S 675Environmental Protection • Introduced by Kirsten Gillibrand on 2017-3-21

Has summary

Status: Awaiting floor or committee vote

Last action: 2017-5-17

Vote

(This measure has not been amended since it was introduced. The summary has been expanded because action occurred on the measure.)

Long Island Sound Restoration and Stewardship Act

(Sec. 2) This bill amends the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (commonly known as the Clean Water Act) to direct the Office of the Management Conference of the Long Island Sound Study within the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to include in studies on strengthening the implementation of the Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan for Long Island Sound: (1) environmental impacts on the sound watershed; and (2) planning initiatives that identify areas most suitable for various activities in order to reduce conflicts among uses, reduce adverse environmental impacts, facilitate compatible uses, or preserve critical ecosystem services.

The office must: (1) develop and implement strategies to increase education and awareness about the ecological health and water quality of the sound; and (2) monitor progress toward meeting the goals, actions, and schedules of the plan.

Grants in support of the plan (other than citizen involvement and education grants) must not exceed 60% (currently 50%) of the cost of research, studies, or work.

The bill establishes a biennial reporting requirement with respect to the office's implementation of the plan. In addition, the President's annual budget must include information about the involvement of each federal department and agency in the protection and restoration of the Long Island Sound watershed, including an interagency crosscut budget and a summary of proposed modifications to the plan for the following year.

The EPA must coordinate the actions of all federal departments and agencies that impact water quality in the Long Island Sound watershed to improve the water quality and living resources of the watershed.

A federal agency that owns or occupies real property, or carries out activities, within the sound watershed must: (1) participate in regional and subwatershed planning, protection, and restoration activities; and (2) ensure that the property and activities are consistent with the plan to the maximum extent practicable.

The bill: (1) extends the Long Island Sound Stewardship Advisory Committee through 2023, and (2) exempts the committee from requirements of the Federal Advisory Committee Act.

(Sec. 3) The bill reauthorizes the Management Conference of the Long Island Sound Study, the Long Island Sound Stewardship Act of 2006, the Long Island Sound Grants, and Long Island Sound Stewardship Grants through FY2023.

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